Posts Tagged ‘Astronomy’

Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joins Dark Matter Hunt

JinPing

China has joined Italy, the United States and Japan in the hunt for the elusive dark matter. The team, led by Dr. Xiangdong Ji, a physicist and Dean of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, has set up the deepest laboratory in the world, 2,500 meters under the marble mountain of JinPing in Sichuan province, in the southwest of China.

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Reaching for an Astronomy Degree? You’re in Good Company

U.S. astronomy degrees awarded 2001-2011. Source: AIP.

If you’re thinking of pursuing an undergrad or grad degree in astronomy, you’re not alone.

In fact, 2011* set a record for most astronomy degrees awarded in the United States — Bachelor’s had the highest number ever (ever!!) while the number of Ph.Ds awarded missed tying 2008′s all-time high by one measly degree (160 were awarded in 2011, 161 in 2008).

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Nuclear Physics @ Central Michigan U (Podcast #8)

Redshaw, Wimmer, Perdikakis NSCL

Greetings from GradSchoolShopper headquarters! We recently talked with some of the folks at Central Michigan University’s graduate physics program about the very cool work they’re doing, and their proud collaboration with the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (soon to be the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams). Keep reading to find out what CMU can offer you as a student.

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GradSchoolShopper.com gets a new home page

newhomepage

The site has been redesigned to bring to the surface the new content, features and functions developed in the past year.

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Graduate Programs in Physics, Astronomy, and Related Fields shipped to participating departments and SPS chapters

GSS_Prgrms2013_front_cvr_fnl

The 2013 edition of Graduate Programs in Physics, Astronomy, and Related Fields has been shipped to participating departments and SPS chapters.

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Advice to Students

Relax, don’t panic! Grad school can be very hard and exhausting, especially in the beginning, but it will get better. — Dr. Nicole Gugliucci, Astronomer, CosmoQuest, Podcast Episode #5

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